Sinéad O’Connor: Nothing Compares 2 U

June 26, 2006

Sinead O'ConnorSinéad O’Connor‘s electrifying performance of this great song by Prince, “Nothing Compares 2U” is thrillingly captured in this video. The arrangement as well as the chord choices in this song are Neanderthal — I wish someone would remix it, cutting out everything except her voice, and start over. The sleazy ah-aaahhh-ahh in the background is just wrong. I can’t imagine it was her idea.

It’s really too bad she mucked up her career so badly. Some people should just keep their mouths closed. Just because you get famous does not mean the world REALLY wants to hear what you think — especially if you are a musician or a professional athlete (See my post, “Damage Control for Rufus” a few weeks back.). Bob Dylan got it right: keep a low profile, just keep writing and performing your music, or playing your sport, and shutup. (My philosophy used to be to not talk about religion or life philosophy unless someone asks you. I’m now revising that to just not talk about it at all. It’s so personal, it rarely serves much purpose except to make intra-personal walls even higher.)
Vincent Neville and weht.com (what ever happened to?) brings us up to date on Sinéad, or at least up to 2005:

  • In 2003 she announced her departure from the spotlight stating “she no longer wanted to be regarded as a famous person.”
  • In March, 2004 she gave birth to a baby boy in Dublin, Ireland. Her third child.
  • In between 2000 and now also became a priest in a breakaway group of the Catholic church in Ireland. She wore a Roman collar and styled herself Mother Bernadette.
  • Always controversial, she defended the IRA attacked compatriots U2, pissed off Frank Sinatra, declared herself to be a lesbian, and tore up a picture of the Pope on Saturday Night Live.

Over the past five years she has been bisexual, lesbian and now is back to heterosexual. SHe is pregnant with her fourth child. Her next album, “THEOLOGY” is scheduled for release in October 2006 and is supposed to be half with just voice and guitar, and the other half will the the same material but orchestrated. I look forward to hearing it. (I went on to amazon.com to listen to some of her most recent music and it crashed my computer. I won’t infer anything more than a confused computer.)

{ 2 comments… read them below or add one }

citrus June 26, 2006 at 5:57 am

“My philosophy used to be to not talk about religion or life philosophy unless someone asks you. I’m now revising that to just not talk about it at all. It’s so personal, it rarely serves much purpose except to make intra-personal walls even higher.”
Uh, does this mean it’s OK to talk about most anything but that which flows deepest in one’s life? If so, it seems to me that this leaves social conversation on a slippery slope to eternal superficiality. La Dolce Vita replayed?
Citrus

Roger Bourland June 26, 2006 at 6:39 am

Oh well, you got me on that; at the wedding a few weeks ago, I was seated at a table with a young married couple. The man, a shortish chap in his mid-20s, told me he was a philosopher. I haven’t had that stimulating of a conversation in years. He told me about his dissertation and I actually was able to help him with it. Having that conversation felt so GOOD! Why can’t all conversations be like that. Well, I guess I’d burn out.

So, sure, I hope to have deep conversations, but so far my experience still supports “my philosophy” (above).

After resisting, I started a new category THE SPIRIT HIGHWAY where I confess and think over things spiritual, successful and not, in my life. The posts are open for comments, blogging is a new kind of communication, so my other theory is also true: look what people DO and less at what they say — that especially goes for me.

As a teacher, I only discuss religion in terms of encouraging students to be open to all points of view. I am not comfortable discussing my own thoughts on any of these topics, but rather to discuss them respectfully if and when they are brought up in class.

In discussing religion, yeah, I think people rarely budge on what they believe. The best, and unfortunately rarest, conversation, is one where differing points of view are on the table, and there is no “attitude” or superiority or condescension on either side. But alas, this is rare. And when arguing about religion comes down to bitter disagreement or stubbornness, and people end up actually disliking each other, what’s the point?

That’s what I meant.

Previous post:

Next post: