Blogs: new life on Facebook

February 11, 2009

I recently discovered an option where my blog can be posted in the NOTES section of my Facebook page. I was amazed at the response — of course, the people receiving it are all my pals, but duhhh. Seems like a good idea. (BTW: for my Facebook friends, this is an RSS feed from my blog, which can be read at http://rogerbourland.com/blog/)

Last week, Musical Perceptions released its bi-annual ranking of the 50 Top Classical Blogs (yours truly was nr.34 on the Google rankings). Steve’s method and comments were instructive:

Google backlinks will count links from non-blogs, and don’t expire after 6 months, so older blogs have an advantage. There was a lot of movement on this list, including the complete dropping of Opera Chic from 2nd to 56th! The average change in number of backlinks among the top 50 was -139, the average among all 252 blogs was -38. I had another thought while polishing this list on why there are fewer links to classical music blogs. I know of many bloggers who have become active on Facebook or have created their own online social forums (NetNewMusic.net for one). Perhaps these opportunities to interact have reduced links as means of talking between blogs. I should also acknowledge that AC Douglas has found Google links to be fluctuating wildly right now, so any drops could be affected by that. [My italics]

He comments on the fact that many of the classical blog backlinks [and readership?] appear to have fallen (mine rose 161). He speculates that it could be a Google issue, or that Facebook, MySpace and other online forums have stepped up to the plate. Whatever the reason, it got me thinking and realizing that many would rather go to one website (e.g. Facebook) to check in on all their friends, rather than a myriad of different sites. I must say that I have thoroughly enjoyed the new social-ness afforded by Facebook. I now know what so many of my friends, colleagues and students have been doing. No increase in face-time, but at least I know what they are doing (or what they TELL us they are doing).

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